Today’s Extra for Jan. 21: Release Stress with One Simple Technique

Release Stress with One Simple Technique

Ever wondered what the biggest problem in life is? Yes, it’s the inability to relax! This is a true story: I met John at a stress-release workshop I was teaching in Scotland. He was a schoolteacher in a run down area of Glasgow. As if that wasn’t hard enough, he was a history teacher, a subject that most of his pupils were completely uninterested in.

Teaching had become a source of immense stress; John would regularly lose his temper and was planning to quit. I saw him again a year later at a follow-up workshop. John looked refreshed and radiant, so I fully expected to hear that he’d got a different job. Instead, he told me that he’d become head of the department. The difference? John had done nothing other than Yoga Nidra, an ancient yogic relaxation practice that I had taught him, every morning before going to school. This had led to a state of deep calm. As a result, both his attitude and approach at work had radically improved. Being mindfully relaxed is the ultimate life-changing gift we can give ourselves.

Stress is nothing new. Ever since the beginning of time we have encountered stressful situations, such as the cavemen who had to hunt for food and the resulting fight-or-flight dilemma when confronted with wild animals. The stress-producing factors may be different now but they have the same effect. It’s quite amazing to me that after thousands of years we still haven’t figured out how we need to relax! And in our current world situation, relaxation is vital.

Unless we can look at stressful difficulties with mindful awareness then all we really do is create more stress: a tense mind creates greater tension, while a calm and clear mind creates clarity and positivity. When we are stressed then everything becomes an irritation, no matter how well intended. Friendships are lost and families broken as achievements and possessions become more important than kindness and caring.

We can’t hide from stress, but we do take being stressed for granted without doing anything about it until it becomes unmanageable. We think relaxation can be accomplished by indulging in mindless and distracting activities. At times this is true. But more often they become an escape from our inability to cope in a world of conflicting pressures and prejudices. Stress throws us into regrets of the past and fears of the future and we lose the ability to be in the present moment. Meantime guilt, shame and blame create unimaginable scenarios. As the anxiety becomes too much to handle we begin to look outside ourselves for help, such as to alcohol, drugs, or therapy. Such is our ‘normal’ state of being!

Do you get upset or angry when matters don’t go as planned? Do you need to be in control, or can you allow events to take their natural course? Do you believe you are right and so others are wrong? Are you able to see things as they are without prejudice or bias? Do you bear grudges and hold on to things or can you let go and move on? These are important questions to ask ourselves in order to become more tolerant, kind, and relaxed.

Confusion and misunderstanding make us desperate for change, but we don’t know how to bring about the transformation we yearn for. So we change the superficial things, like our hairstyle or clothes, we even have a facelift or hair transplant. All we want is to be wanted! But if we change our lives from within then the outer will also transform. Being mindfully relaxed has a hugely positive effect on our looks, health, on others, and the world we live in. What more could we want?

 

Ed Shapiro is the author of The Art Of Mindful Relaxation, The Heart of Yoga Nidra. Award-winning Authors Ed and Deb are mindfulness, meditation and yoga experts. Deb is the author of Your Body Speaks Your Mind, now in 19 languages. They have six meditation downloads. See more at EdandDebShapiro.com

Source:

Care2.com

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The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Jan. 21: SNOWSHOEING IN THE WINTER: TIPS TO GET STARTED

 

SNOWSHOEING IN THE WINTER: TIPS TO GET STARTED

Snowshoes have come a long way since their origins some 7,000 years ago. Back then, it’s safe to guess that snowshoeing was not considered a leisure winter sport.

In fact, without even researching it much, I can safely wager that snowshoes were made so that people could survive winter. You know: head out, forage for food, return home with a dead animal—also known as “dinner for the family.”

 

Times have changed. And so have snowshoes.

Originally, snowshoes were made from wood and rawhide. Current-day versions using those materials are still available to buy, as are authentic antique versions that are often found adorning the walls of vacation ski homes. However, the rapid growth of snowshoeing as a sport in the 1990s was due to modern versions of snowshoes made with aluminum or stainless steel frames and nylon, plastic, or polypropylene decking. They are light and relatively inexpensive.

 

Old versus new snowshoes!

I bought a pair of Tubbs snowshoes in the late 1990s. Except for adjusting the straps or bindings to fit whichever pair of boots (waterproof and insulated work best) I am wearing, they are quite simple to use. Newer versions have even easier to adjust bindings and straps. In fact, if you are reasonably fit and feel comfortable walking, then you should have an easy time learning to snowshoe!

BEST SNOWSHOE EQUIPMENT

• One pair of snowshoes (many outdoor shops rent equipment and offer lessons)

• Proper outdoor clothing

• Sturdy winter boots (or specialty snowshoe boots)

• One pair of ski poles or trekking poles (optional)

• Gaiters (optional)

• Headlamp (for nighttime snowshoeing)

The best way to learn a new sport is from a professional instructor, and many places that rent or sell snowshoes offer short lessons.

SNOWSHOEING TIPS & TECHNIQUES

Here’s what to keep in mind on your first day out:

• Practice on a flat snowy surface without ice. Most modern snowshoes have crampons on the bottom. These crampons work best in fluffy snow and aren’t as easy to use on icy steep slopes, especially going downhill. That’s just something to keep in mind as you are experimenting with this new sport.

• “Put one foot in front of the other.” The movement pattern is the same as walking. Lift your left foot, bending at the knee so that the snowshoe comes off the snowy surface, and take a step. Repeat this with your right foot. That’s it—just like walking, except that you have much larger “shoes” that hinge away from your foot as you lift your foot. Gaiters are also optional for snowshoeing. If the snow is very light and not packed down, and very deep, gaiters will help to protect your boots and the bottom of your snow pants from snow getting inside. In most instances, snowshoes do a great job of keeping you above the snow, and you will not need gaiters.

• Use poles. Though poles are optional, they give you two more points of balance while snowshoeing. I prefer trekking poles that are adjustable so I that can dial in the perfect pole length. The arm motions using poles are the same as when you walk and should feel natural. Simultaneously, step with your left leg and swing your right pole forward with a light flick of the wrist to put the pole basket in front of you, then plant the pole. In this case, your balance is moving from your right foot to your left foot and right pole, as your momentum moves forward. That’s as much physics as I can share with you. Just remember: It feels like walking.

• Look ahead, not straight down at your shiny new snowshoes. There are two reasons you should look ahead. The first: You are outside and it’s a beautiful winter wonderland. Take in the sights, sounds and smells. The second: Looking ahead improves your balance.

Snowshoeing is a great sport for all ages. You can head out on wooded adventures or across a frozen lake.

And that optional headlamp I mentioned in the equipment list above? If you ever venture out for a nighttime snowshoe under a full Moon, you might get hooked on snowshoeing just like I did.

 

During the winter months, Heather Atwell blogs about outdoor activities for Almanac.com. The offspring of parents who met in the lift line at Vermont’s Stowe Mountain, Heather has skied since she could walk. She’s a fully certified PSIA instructor who knows New England ski areas from her four years working for Ski Vermont and from her lifelong love of the sport. Heather’s recipe for winter happiness: Mix fresh snow and a little outdoor adventure.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Jan. 21: WINTER EXERCISE: NO EXCUSES

 

WINTER EXERCISE: NO EXCUSES

Motivation flagging? Live too far from a gym? No room in the house for exercise equipment? Not enough light before or after work? Feeling sluggish?

A lot of people abandon regular exercise during the winter. If that describes you, I know you have a slew of excuses, because I’ve used most of ‘em myself.

But even the best excuses ignore the cardinal law of physical fitness: Use it or lose it. You only get the fitness you earn today. You can’t store it up until the weather improves and the days get longer.

Don’t stop!
By the time the forsythia blooms, your sedentary body will have lost a lot of ground. It will take weeks or months of diligent work to get back to the fitness level (and its corresponding physical and psychological health benefits) you had when you laid off around Thanksgiving.

Just get going.

Walk
To improve traction, balance, and the quality of winter walking, invest in some good quality trekking poles. Get the adjustable kind with spring-loaded shock absorption, and you can use them for snowshoeing and summer hiking, too.

Yaktrax or other pull-on “grippers” can improve your confidence when conditions are icy. Not enough light after work? Take to a well-lit parking lot, streets with streetlights. Turn on the outside light and walk up and down your own driveway. If you have a mall nearby, walk there. Better yet, walk outdoors around the entire mall a few times.

Walk (or run) the stairs

If you have stairs in your home and the knees for it, pump up the volume on your MP3player or radio and hit the stairs. Don’t overdo these workouts; work up by going slowly and starting with only a few repetitions.

I keep my freezer and refrigerator in the basement and my computer workstation in a third-story attic. Besides keeping my leg muscle strong, this arrangement allows me to burn 11 pounds’ worth of calories each year just going about my daily activities.

Jump rope
Jumping rope isn’t just for kids. If you can work up to it, 15 minutes a day will give you the fitness benefits of half an hour of running or a 1000-yard swim. All you need is a rop[e and comfortable shoes. If your home has high ceilings, you can jump indoors. Other locations: a porch, garage, driveway, parking lot or other paved surface.

Strap on the snowshoes
I consider the snowshoes and poles we bought 12 years ago a major health investment. We’ve used them often all winter long ever since.

Snowshoes allow you to walk on water (or at least float on snow). If you can walk, you can snowshoe, especially in today’s lightweight, easy-on-easy-off models. This is the best time of year to buy new and used snowshoes. If you can, invest in a pair of trekking poles, too. They improve balance and stability, offer work for your upper body, and increase the workout intensity (building muscle, burning more calories).

Find a partner
Nothing  helps maintain your motivation to exercise like finding a partner as committed to his/her health and well being as you. A good walking/running/indoor biking partner makes the time fly and helps you forget your discomfort.

You don’t have to share the same political views or travel in the same social circles.The only requirements for a training partner/fitness buddy: 1. someone about the same fitness level as you, and 2. someone who’ll always shows up.

One to remember
But sometimes you have no choice but to go it alone.

My most memorable winter workout took place early one evening during a blizzard—a total whiteout with fierce winds. More than a foot of snow had already fallen, and it was accumulating a couple of inches per hour.

I pulled on my heaviest winter duds, turned on the outside light, and tramped around and around our circular driveway.

Whiteout conditions, where the snow seems to fall and swirl from all directions, confuse spatial perception to the point where it becomes difficult to tell up from down. To orient myself, I followed my footsteps, finding them almost totally obscured by the time I came around again.

I lost track of time in that other-worldly environment, stopping only when the power went out and I lost my light. Though I wouldn’t be able to recreate this event, I won’t forget it or the utter rapture of it.

My point? When it comes to exercise, seize the moment!

 

ABOUT THIS BLOG

“Living Naturally” is all about living a naturally healthy lifestyle. Margaret Boyles covers health tips, ways to avoid illness, natural remedies, food that’s good for body and soul, recipes for homemade beauty products, and ideas to make your home a healthy, safe haven. Our goal is also to encourage self-sufficiency, whether it’s relearning some age-old skills or getting informed on modern improvements that help us live better, healthier lives.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Jan. 21: 10-MINUTE WORKOUTS: ESPECIALLY GOOD IN WINTER

 

10-MINUTE WORKOUTS: ESPECIALLY GOOD IN WINTER

A growing body of research suggests that sneaking in one or several 10-minute bouts of exercise can deliver impressive health and fitness benefits.

That’s good to know, especially in winter, when ice, snow, cold, lack of light, and—face it—low or no motivation encourage us to move less, sit more, and eat holiday goodies for comfort.

Consider also

  • Brief workouts help beginning exercisers ease into a more active life. Begin with one 10-minute block and work up to three or more a day. Of course, you could gradually stretch any of these to 12, 15, or 20 minutes if the situation permits.

Veteran exercisers and athletes can use a 10- or 15-minute workout as a motivational tool on those days when they lose their oomph and can’t work up the get up and go. When that happens to you, negotiate with your lower angels. Say, “Okay, we don’t have to bike for an hour. We’ll only go for 10 minutes.” I’ve found this trick effective. After a few minutes, I almost always find myself willing to stretch it to 20 minutes, 30 minutes, or even longer.

A few favorites

So, what constitutes a 10-minute workout? Simple: keep that body in motion for 10 minutes.

Most exercise specialists say intensity—getting your heart rate up to the point of discomfort, and keeping it up for several minutes—works best for maintaining or increasing overall fitness. Warm up slowly for a couple of minutes before you pump up the intensity; slow down for a couple of minutes toward the end.

If you’re pregnant, sedentary, severely overweight, suffering from a chronic disease or injury, talk to your doctor before beginning any high-intensity exercise, even short bouts of it.

Jump for joy

Jumping rope for 10 minutes will give you a rip-roarin’ workout. It burns more calories than running. It boosts your mood. It improves your balance and your body’s natural rhythm. You can jump indoors or out. You can pack your rope and jump on vacation. You don’t need fancy clothes. You don’t even need a rope. Twirling your wrists as if you had one works about as well.

Start by marching or running in place for a minute or two, then begin jumping slowly. Beginners can try alternating 30 jumps with 30 steps of marching in place. (Even after years of hard-core triathlon training, it took me two months to work up to a few minutes of glitch-free jumping.)

Parking-lot trot

Having trouble concentrating at work (even at home)? Pull out that pair of shoes you keep under your desk and substitute a snack break for a brisk 10-minute walk or trot around the perimeter of the parking lot, grounds, or driveway

During the winter months, parking lots and driveways are nearly always plowed and sanded or salted for safety.

Physical exercise helps break the abstraction of “knowledge work” and the fatigue of repetitive-motion physical work. I’ll testify that it works wonders for breaking writer’s block.

Why wait?

Most of us spend a lot of time waiting: for a child to have his teeth cleaned or finish her swimming lesson, for the doctor after you’re told she’s running 30 minutes late, for a car repair, for the casserole to bake. Just keep a pair of comfortable shoes at the ready, check your watch, and head out.

Step it up

Stuck indoors at home with a small child? Dinner in the oven? Turn on some tunes and work those stairs! Warm up with a slow half-dozen flights up and down. Then charge up, walk down, charge up again, walk down, and repeat. Note: This workout requires stairways, strong knees, good balance, and good concentration, especially going down, to avoid falls. Add more work to this effort by swinging light hand weights as you go up.

If you work in an office building with several floors and well-lit stairwells, or have an appointment in one, walk up and down the stairs for a few minutes. Hold the handrail going down in case you feel dizzy.

Deep-snow after-dark shuffle

I discovered this one many years ago while homebound with a sick child during a three-day blizzard. I bundled up and pulled on my insulated boots after dinner, turned on the outside light, and began tramping around the unplowed circular driveway. The deep snow and my clunky boots cushioned the impact and offered muscle-building resistance. The heavy snow muffled noise from the street and falling snow transformed the night. I’ve continued this magical practice every year during big snowstorms, running, walking, skipping, jumping, or shuffling, often for much longer than 10 minutes.

Load-that-woodbox workout

Remember the old saw about necessity, the mother of invention? In our wood-burning household, we have to cart firewood from the woodshed into the house every day to stay warm. When it’s my turn to load the living-room woodbox, I begin with few shoulder raises with a couple of heavy chunks, perform half-squats with a heavy armload, push the big-wheeled wood carrier around the driveway four or five times before I bring the wood indoors.

You get the idea here, stretch almost any necessary job into an energetic 10-minute workout.

Airport aerobics

You have a flight ahead, during which you’ll probably sit most of the time. Your flight doesn’t leave for an hour or two or more. Although large airports offer plenty of opportunities to eat, drink, shop, and sit, why not walk the concourse? Many large airports offer special walking paths or fitness spaces. I’ve never used one of these, but I’ve logged as many as three miles of brisk walking throughout the concourses before boarding a flight.

What do you do with your carry-on luggage? Well, you could roll it or carry it, rent a locker and stash it, or do what I do, carry it all in a backpack and hike along with it.

Supermarket sashay

You’ve arrived at the supermarket with a two-page grocery list and found the parking lot full. You have to park a football field away from the door. Time for action!

Pull on your action-ready shoes and make at least two full trips around the outside perimeter of the parking lot before you go into the store. Wend your way up and down the center aisles, collecting items on your list as you go. Then walk back along the same route in reverse, picking up anything you might have missed. Now push the cart twice around the interior perimeter of the store, collecting the fresh stuff: fruit and vegetables, eggs, dairy products, poultry, and meat the second time around.

After you’ve checked out, make another brisk turn or two around the parking lot perimeter with your full cart. Watch for traffic!

A final note: Poke around in the activities of your ordinary days for opportunities like these to boost your activity level. Don’t forget to fidget!

 

ABOUT THIS BLOG

“Living Naturally” is all about living a naturally healthy lifestyle. Margaret Boyles covers health tips, ways to avoid illness, natural remedies, food that’s good for body and soul, recipes for homemade beauty products, and ideas to make your home a healthy, safe haven. Our goal is also to encourage self-sufficiency, whether it’s relearning some age-old skills or getting informed on modern improvements that help us live better, healthier lives.

Holidays Around The World for Jan. 21: Babin Den

Babin Den

January 21

In Bulgaria the old women who helped deliver babies—much like the modern midwife—were called baba, or grandmother. It was widely believed that the baby received some of the baba’s wisdom, and it was customary for the baby’s parents to bring the baba flowers on a particular day each year, called Grandmother’s Day or Day of the Midwives . Eventually the children grew up, but they would continue to visit their baba each year.

Most babies in Bulgaria today are born in hospitals, so the children bring flowers to the doctors and nurses who assisted at their birth. Another traditional activity on this day involves boys dunking girls in the icy waters of rivers and lakes, supposedly to bring them good health in the coming year.

See also Grandparents’ Day
SOURCES:
BkFest-1937, p. 66
BkHolWrld-1986, Jan 20

This Day In History: Death of Last Native Speaker Leads to Extinction of Eyak Language (2008)

Death of Last Native Speaker Leads to Extinction of Eyak Language (2008)

Eyak is an extinct Na-Dené language historically spoken by the Eyak people, indigenous to south-central Alaska, near the mouth of the Copper River.

The closest relatives of Eyak are the Athabaskan languages. The Eyak–Athabaskan group forms a basic division of the Na-Dené language phylum, the other one being Tlingit

Numerous Tlingit place names along the Gulf Coast are derived from names in Eyak; they have obscure or even nonsensical meanings in Tlingit, but oral tradition has maintained many Eyak etymologies. The existence of Eyak-derived Tlingit names along most of the coast towards southeast Alaska is strong evidence that the prehistoric range of Eyak was once far greater than it was at the time of European contact. This confirms both Tlingit and Eyak oral histories of migration throughout the region.

Extinction
Marie Smith Jones (May 14, 1918 – January 21, 2008)[1][2][3] of Cordova was the language’s last native speaker, and the last full-blooded Eyak. Because of the dying off of its native speakers, Eyak became a symbol in the fight against language extinction.[4]

The spread of English and suppression of aboriginal languages are not the only reasons for the decline of the Eyak language. The northward migration of the Tlingit people around Yakutat in precontact times encouraged the use of Tlingit rather than Eyak along much of the Pacific Coast of Alaska. Eyak was also under pressure from its neighbors to the west, the Alutiiq people of Prince William Sound, as well as some pressure from the people of the Copper River valley. Eyak and Tlingit culture began to merge along the Gulf Coast, and a number of Eyak-speaking groups were absorbed by the Gulf Coast Tlingit populations. This resulted in the replacement of Eyak by Tlingit among most of the mixed groups after a few generations, as reported in Tlingit oral histories of the area.

Resurrection
In June 2010, the Anchorage Daily News published an article about Guillaume Leduey, a French college student with an unexpected connection to the Eyak language. Beginning at age 12, he had taught himself Eyak, utilizing print and audio instructional materials he obtained from the Alaska Native Language Center. During that time, he never traveled to Alaska or conversed with Marie Smith Jones, the last native speaker.[5]

That same month that the article was published, he traveled to Alaska and met with Dr. Michael Krauss, a noted linguist and Professor Emeritus at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Dr. Krauss assisted Leduey with proper Eyak phonological pronunciation and assigned further instruction in grammar and morphology—including morphemic analyses of traditional Eyak stories.

In June 2011, Leduey returned to Alaska to facilitate Eyak language workshops in Anchorage and Cordova. He is now regarded as a fluent speaker, translator, and instructor of Eyak.[6] Despite his fluency, Eyak remains classified as “Extinct” as there is no native speaker left. Currently, Leduey provides instruction and curriculum assistance to the Eyak Language Project from France.

Read More….

Your Daily Inspiration for January 21: Intent

 

 

 

Intent

BY MADISYN TAYLOR

When we live with intent, we own our actions; instead of habitually performing them.

We tend to associate the energy of intent with complicated or profoundly meaningful actions that require our full attention and effort in order to succeed. For example, walking a tightrope, taking a test, and taking a vow are all tasks that call us to be fully present and single-minded. However, intent can also be applied to everyday events, like eating breakfast or going to work. In fact, everything we do benefits from the presence of intent, which has the power to transform seemingly mundane tasks into profound experiences. You only have to try it to find out.

Intent is one of the cornerstones of the Zen tradition of Buddhism in which monks work for years to develop the stillness and sharpness of mind to do only one thing at a time. Most of the time we are doing one thing and thinking of something else, or even doing three things at the same time, such as talking on the phone, doing dishes, and boiling water for tea. There is nothing inherently wrong with multitasking, which seems necessary at times, especially in the midst of family life. However, balancing this with a healthy dose of intentional activity can provide valuable insight into the benefits of doing one thing at a time, being fully present with whatever the task at hand happens to be.

From the moment we wake up, we can apply intent to our situation by simply saying to ourselves, “I am aware that I am now awake.” We can use this simple tool throughout our day, saying, “I am aware that I am driving to work.” “I am aware that I am making dinner.” Or even, “I am aware that I am breathing.” As we acknowledge what we are doing in these moments, we come alive to our bodies and to the world, owning our actions instead of habitually performing them. We may realize how often we act without intention and how this disengages us from reality. Applying the energy of intent to even one task a day has the power to transform our lives. Just imagine what would happen if we were able to apply that power to our entire day.

 

Read Your Zodiac Sign’s Tarotscope: Week of January 21

Read Your Zodiac Sign’s Tarotscope: Week of January 21

Read what’s in the cards for your sign this week!

Tarot.com Staff

Welcome to the week of January 21! Each week a card will be pulled for your zodiac sign, offering the guidance and insight needed to maximize your opportunities and avoid any obstacles headed your way. Reveal the message the Tarot has for YOU now!

Aries Tarotscope (March 21 – April 19)

Your card for the week: The High Priestess

The High Priestess is primarily a card about intuition. This week, you’re being called to work on your perceptive skills, so that you can fine-tune your ability to hear your inner voice and receive messages from your unconscious mind. Have you been out of balance in a certain area of your life? Are you unsure if you’re on the right path regarding a specific situation? This card is encouraging you connect with your internal wisdom, because the answer you’re seeking is already inside of you.

 

Taurus Tarotscope (April 20 – May 20)

Your card for the week: 10 of Swords

The 10 of Swords acknowledges you are going through a painful time right now. Perhaps you’ve been betrayed, or it could be you’re experiencing a period of things crashing down on you. These types of experiences are never pleasant to go through, but this week you’re being called to focus on the new beginning that this ending can make way for. Even though you may feel like you’ve hit rock bottom, take solace in the fact that there’s nowhere else to go but up. Remember, obstacles can be opportunities in disguise.

 

Gemini Tarotscope (May 21 – June 20)

Your card for the week: 5 of Cups

The 5 of Cups indicates you’ve been allowing yourself to wade in a sea of regret and disappointment. While the pain you’re feeling is very real and shouldn’t be minimized, it isn’t a free pass to stay stuck in this mode forever. By choosing to focus on your perceived failures or mistakes, you can’t see the positive things right in front of you, nor can you move on toward greener pastures. There’s still hope, and it’s important this week that you find where that hope is and shift your attention to that.

 

Cancer Tarotscope (June 21 – July 22)

Your card for the week: The Hermit

It’s time to take a break from your everyday life! The Hermit is indicating that you may have a need to withdraw and reflect this week. It could be that you’ve been immersed in many new experiences or spent much of your time recently socializing. Now it is necessary to go for a walk in the forest, take a long bath, book a weekend getaway, or anything else that helps you disconnect from the outside world and reconnect with your inner world. Recharging your spiritual batteries will help you reemerge with a renewed perspective.

 

Leo Tarotscope (July 23 – Aug. 22)

Your card for the week: Queen of Swords

Get ready to sit high upon your throne this week! The Queen of Swords is incredibly perceptive, embodying an intellectual sharpness and maturity that helps her tune out the noise of emotion and outside opinion. You could be facing a decision now or in the near future, and this card is serving as a reminder to rely on your logic and to look at all the facts before proceeding. You have an abundance of experience and wisdom that you can draw upon, so make sure to utilize it.

 

Virgo Tarotscope (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22)

Your card for the week: 8 of Cups

This week you’re being called to separate yourself from a disappointing situation or unfulfilling relationship in your life. The 8 of Cups acknowledges that this split will be painful, especially since you’ve devoted so much time and energy into it. In fact, this could be one of the reasons you haven’t moved on already. Rather than focusing on what the situation could have been or hoping things will change, accept it for what it is. Remember, leaving will hurt you temporarily but staying could hurt you more in the long run.

 

Libra Tarotscope (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22)

Your card for the week: 6 of Swords

This could be the week you finally release something that has been hanging over you for far too long. The 6 of Swords serves as a reminder that, although it may be difficult, sometimes we have no choice but to move on from a challenging situation. What have you been holding onto that has prevented you from creating a brighter future for yourself? Now is the time to let this go once and for all. This won’t be an easy task, but ultimately, it is the right thing to do.

 

Scorpio Tarotscope (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21)

Your card for the week: 4 of Cups

The 4 of Cups signals that you have been feeling unfulfilled and craving some kind of change in your life. Perhaps you are looking around and seeing what others have, longing for those things that aren’t a part of your own life. It might also be that you feel unmotivated in your present circumstances. While it’s nice to aspire, it’s easy to get caught up in an unhealthy cycle of desire. This week try to address the root cause of these feelings. Is the grass really greener on the other side, or do you just need to spend time watering your own grass?

 

Sagittarius Tarotscope (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21)

Your card for the week: 5 of Wands

Chaos, and conflict, and confusion … oh my! The 5 of Wands indicates you’ve been trying to work toward some type of goal but are being met with challenges that get in the way of your progress. Perhaps you feel as though your point of view is being challenged, or it could be you’re finding it difficult to work with a specific person. Either way, you’re being challenged this week to truly listen to others’ opinions. You might find that what initially seemed like criticism was actually constructive feedback that will help you in the long run.

 

Capricorn Tarotscope (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19)

Your card for the week: 4 of Swords

Rest, reflect, and recover. That is the message the 4 of Swords has for you this week. You may have faced a difficult situation recently, such as the loss of a job, the ending of a relationship, or issues related to money. This matter took a lot out of you, and now you might be feeling mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually drained. Take some time to recuperate and recharge. It’s important to give yourself this opportunity to reactivate yourself — it helps you go back into the world with a rejuvenated spirit and a new perspective.

 

Aquarius Tarotscope (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18)

Your card for the week: Ace of Swords

Your breakthrough moment has arrived! The Ace of Swords signals that the fog is lifting, and you have greater mental clarity this week. It may feel as though you’re viewing the world through a brand-new lens, one that helps you cut through the noise and get to the truth of the matter. Is a situation not what it seems? Has someone been deceiving you? Have you been deceiving yourself? You’re being handed an opportunity to clear the air and get to the heart of the matter.

 

Pisces Tarotscope (Feb. 19 – March 20)

Your card for the week: Queen of Cups

The Queen of Cups indicates emotional maturity, compassion, and a nurturing spirit. This week you are being called to express this energy in some way. Perhaps a friend approaches you with relationship troubles, or it could be that a colleague is coming to you for support with a problem they’re facing. When this happens, listen from the heart as they speak but remain emotionally separated from the issue. While it may be tempting to dive head-first into the situation with them, understand that only they can work themselves out of their predicament.

 

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Get A Jump On Tomorrow, Your Daily Horoscopes for Tuesday, January 22

Get A Jump On Tomorrow….

Your Daily Horoscopes for Tuesday, January 22

 

Moon Alert

Avoid shopping or important decisions from 8 PM to 11 PM EST today (5 PM to 8 PM PST ). After that, the Moon moves from Leo into Virgo.

Aries (March 21-April 19)

What a difference a day makes! To make this a spectacular day, you might travel somewhere exciting. If you cannot travel, you can explore your own city or perhaps you can expand your world through learning something new?

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Business and commerce are favoured today. You will benefit from the wealth of others because they will do favours for you or give you gifts or even money – obviously, this is an excellent day to ask a bank for a loan or mortgage. (Plus romance is hot!)

Gemini (May 21-June 20)

This is a lovely day for dealing with members of the public and hanging out with good friends and partners because everyone wants to see your face. They love you! Fair Venus and lucky Jupiter are lined up directly opposite your sign.

Cancer (June 21-July 22)

This is an excellent day at work or for any task that you set yourself today. You feel strong and vigourous. What makes things really perfect is that you will get praise from coworkers and bosses today. In fact, some of you might get a raise. Oh yeah.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

When a fun, playful day! Make plans to party with people you love. Take a long lunch or perhaps play hooky? Join the gang for Happy Hour. Enjoy sports events, playful activities with children and anything to do with the arts and the entertainment world. Great day for a romantic date.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

This is a fabulous day for real-estate negotiations. It’s also great day to entertain at home and enjoy warm relations with family. A relative might be generous to you today. Perhaps they will give you a gift or treat you to good food and drink. A truly feel-good day!

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

This is a wonderful day to schmooze with others because you are in a positive frame of mind and ironically, almost everyone you meet is likewise feeling friendly and upbeat. “Hail fellow, well met!” Great day for short trips and those who sell, promote, teach, act and write.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

This is an excellent day for business, commerce and finance. Look for ways to boost your income. Look for ways to make money. It’s true you might be a tad too optimistic; nevertheless, the gods are blessing you when it comes to money today! Ka-ching!

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

This is a lucky day! You might experience a sudden windfall or an unexpected advantage. Feel free to indulge yourself spend on something lavish and beautiful because your ruler Jupiter and Venus are lined up in your sign. People will seek out your company.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

You have a warm feeling in your tummy today because life feels good. You are happy to be alive and grateful for who you are what you have. (Think of millions of people in this world who are suffering. It’s a sobering realization.) Gratitude is important.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

What a wonderful day to enjoy the company of others. Have fun with your best friends! You will also enjoy your interactions with clubs, groups and organizations because they will benefit you in some way. For some, a friend might become a lover. Oh my.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

You look fabulous in the eyes of bosses, parents, teachers, VIPs and the police. Anyone in a position of power will admire you today. You appear confident, successful and affluent (even if you’re broke). This gives you influence in the world! Use it!

If Your Birthday Is Today

Actress Jennifer Spence (1977) shares your birthday today. You are a multitalented person who is loving, caring and generous. You stand up for what is right! This is your year of harvest and major achievements because you are reaping the benefits of the last decade. You will taste power and leadership in all your relationships. Get going. Make it happen! It’s time to think success, power and money!

 

Source:

GeorgiaNichols.com