The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Nov. 13: NOVEMBER 2018 NIGHT SKY GUIDE

 

NOVEMBER 2018 NIGHT SKY GUIDE

BEST NIGHT SKY EVENTS OF NOVEMBER 2018
Bob Berman
Mid-November, the Moon pairs up with Saturn and Mars. Venus gets brighter. And another meteor shower heads our way. See what’s up tonight in our November 2018 Sky Watch!

SKY WATCH NOVEMBER 2018

by Bob Berman, as featured in The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Our astronomy editor, Bob Berman, sets you up for the best in night sky sightseeing each month, with special tips for finding bright planets and stars, eclipses, meteor showers, and other celestial objects and events.

In late autumn, after most of the leaves have fallen, the forest suddenly becomes transparent. The contours of the land leap out in 3-D, exposing all kinds of subtleties. And many of them are small, bashful—the kind of sights that require us to look up, instead of down. Above our heads, beyond the changed colors of the lingering leaves, we’ll see the night sky as it changes throughout November.

BRIGHT PLANETS

Morning Planets

  • The action switches to the predawn sky as planet Venus has transitioned out of the evening sky and into the morning sky. It’s the brightest object in the sky after the Sun and Moon.
  • The Moon meets returning Venus on the 6th. Look towards sunrise in the eastern sky around 6 A.M.
  • Venus hovers near Virgo’s Spica from the 6th to the 12th and stands 25 degrees high by month’s end.
  • Every day, Venus gets brighter. By mid-month, Venus’ disk will be about 10% illuminated by sunshine. By the month’s end, Venus’ disk will be 25% illuminated in sunshine.

Click here for a free, printable star chart to navigate Venus and the night sky!

Evening Planets

  • On the 1st, Jupiter meets Mercury low in the west; both soon vanish.
  • Mars stands about a third of the way up the southern sky at nightfall. The red planet, having resumed its normal eastward motion against the stars, speeds from Capricornus into Aquarius. Just 12 arcseconds wide and at magnitude zero, it is dimming, losing half its width and is now too small to show useful detail in telescopes.
  • Saturn shines clear above the southwestern horizon at nightfall. The ringed planet shifts lower in the sky each night, preparing to depart the night sky soon.
  • The Moon floats left of ever-lower Saturn on the 11th.
  • The Moon and Mars pair up on November 13 to 16.

METEOR SHOWERS

November boasts two meteor showers.

  • The Taurid meteor showers are visible between November 9 and 12. While this is a minor shower with about 5 meteors per hour, the Taurids are known for bright fireballs—a particularly bright meteor. Seeing one is quite a thrill. Even better, the Moon is now in a waning crescent phase. Rising shortly before sunrise, that means no moonlight to ruin the prime time viewing hours, centered on about 12:30 a.m. local time. See Moon rise and set times here.
  • The Leonids meteor shower peaks on the night of Saturday, November 17 and early the following morning, November 18. A modest shower, the Leonids bring about 10 meteors per hour at their peak. Due to a bright waxing gibbous Moon this year, viewers will see fewer meteors. Check your Moon phase. The best time to look is before dawn around 3 A.M. so you have to set that alarm!

See our 2018 Meteor Shower Calendar (and get ready for the biggest shower of the year in December!).

NOVEMBER’S MOON

November’s Moon was called the Beaver Moon by both the Algonquin tribes and colonial Americans. The Native Americans used the monthly Moons and nature’s signs as a sort of calendar to track the seasons. Why this name? Back then, this was the month to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. The November full Moon was also called the Full Frost Moon by other Native Americans.

November’s full Moon rises November 23, 12:39 A.M. EST.

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The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Nov. 11: Sky Watch for November

SKY MAP (STAR CHART): NOVEMBER 2018

VENUS AT ITS BRIGHTEST
Jeff DeTray from AstronomyBoy.com
The ancient Romans worshiped her as the goddess of love and beauty. Frankie Avalon recorded a #1 hit song about her. She is the brightest thing in the sky after the Sun and Moon. We’re talking about Venus, once thought to be Earth’s planetary twin.

In the second half of November, Venus will be as bright as it ever gets. To see the Venus show, you’ll need to wake up before sunrise and look toward the east-southeast. Venus will be—by far – the brightest object in the sky. Venus never ventures very far from the Sun, so it’s best viewed only a few times a year, when the planetary geometry is just right and then only shortly after sunset or shortly before sunrise. On these occasions, Venus is known as either the Evening Star or the Morning Star.

Venus and Earth DO have some things in common, though not as much as once thought. They are the second and third closest planets to the Sun. Being closer to the Sun means a year on Venus—the time it takes to revolve once around the Sun—lasts 224.7 days compared to Earth’s 365 days. The two planets are composed mainly of rocky material and are nearly the same size, with Venus just slightly smaller. If you weigh 125 pounds on Earth you would weigh about 113 pounds on Venus. Venus comes closer to Earth than any other planet, a mere 24 million miles, and that’s the main reason why it’s so bright.

Because of its similarities to Earth, Venus became the subject of some very fanciful (and quite incorrect) theories. Among the most popular was the supposed existence of complex life on Venus. It was imagined that because it is closer to the Sun than Earth, Venus might simply a warmer, wetter version of our planet. Some believed Venus to be a world of rain forests and jungles, replete with giant trees, dinosaurs, and even intelligent Venusians.

As our scientific knowledge advanced, astronomers learned that Venus is not just warm, it’s excruciatingly hot. The surface temperature reaches 872 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough to melt lead. Venus is also a world of volcanoes, and the whole planet is wrapped in a thick atmosphere comprised mostly of carbon dioxide. This dense atmosphere insulates the planet, preventing heat from escaping and resulting in a runaway greenhouse effect. Venus is an intensely inhospitable place. So much for the rain forest theory!

When the age of space exploration began, Venus’ close proximity meant it became the very first target for interplanetary spacecraft. America’s Mariner 2 was the first successful probe, flying past Venus in 1962. The first successful landing did not come until 1970 when the Soviet Venera 7 spacecraft touched down. Due to the extreme conditions on the planet, it is highly unlikely that a manned landing on Venus will ever be attempted.

This month’s sky map shows Venus where it appears early on Thanksgiving morning, blazing near the bright star Spica in the constellation Virgo the Virgin. The map is accurate any time during the last two weeks of November, so bundle up if necessary and enjoy Venus at its best!

In the words of Frankie Avalon’s “Venus” from 1959:
  Hey, Venus! Oh, Venus!
Make my dreams come true
!

 

VENUS, PLANET OF PARADOX

Bob Berman
Sister planet. Nearest neighbor. Goddess of love. How appealing the planet Venus sounds!

VENUS’ ODDITIES

Few who gaze longingly at Venus are aware of the planet’s oddities.

  • Venus’ surface never budges from about 850°F, day and night.
  • The air is suffocatingly dense, packed with 50 times greater pressure than a pressure cooker.
  • Its atmosphere provides no oxygen whatsoever.
  • Venus’ day is longer than its year. Venus spins on its axis in 243 Earth-days but orbits the Sun in 225 Earth-days.
  • Its clouds are made of white sulfuric acid. Because of this, Venus is deceivingly reflective as a mirror; fully 76 percent of the sunlight gets bounced away from the shiniest planet in our solar system.
  • Beneath clouds of concentrated acid droplets lies clear compressed air that distorts everything into fun-house-mirror images.

Interestingly, the Venusian surface is brightly lit despite being eternally overcast. With illumination that equals Earth’s on a cloudy day, even inexpensive disposable cameras would take correctly exposed photos there, a situation encountered on no other planet.

Of course, no budding photographer or human being is likely to go to Venus. Ever. It’s touching that we named the most luminous “star” after the love goddess. For all eternity, our nearest planet—that dazzling beacon in the western sky—will tantalize with a warning label: Look but don’t touch.

Source

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for November 10: 5 NATURAL SORE THROAT REMEDIES

 

5 NATURAL SORE THROAT REMEDIES

SALT, LEMON, SAGE, APPLE CIDER VINEGAR, AND GINGER
Here are five simple natural sore throat remedies to help ease the discomfort! Let us know how they work for you!

When you have a sore throat, it’s your body’s immune response to viral or bacterial infections. Sore throats can be quite uncomfortable, especially when you swallow. The mucous membranes in your throat are inflamed and swollen.

Of course, the most important thing you can do is drink fluids and stay well hydrated! Keep your throat’s mucous membranes moist so it can heal.

Try drinking or at least sipping water every hour. If it’s uncomfortable, try drinking warm herbal tea such as Echinacea, peppermint, and chamomile. Sucking on an herbal throat lozenger also produces saliva and soothes the throat.

Here are some natural sore throat remedies to provide relief, using simple ingredients from your pantry.

GARGLE WITH SALT WATER

Of course, one common way to ease the discomfort of sore throat is gargling with salt water. The salt helps reduce swelling.

Combine 1 cup of warm water with 1 teaspoon of salt and stir to dissolve. Gargle with a mouthful of this mixture for 30 seconds, once per hour.

GARGLE WITH COOL SAGE TEA

Sage is a wonderful herb used in cooking, but also has antiinflammatory and antibacterial properties to help soothe and help a sore throat.

Mix 1 teaspoon of herb in 1 cup of boiling water for 10 minutes, then strain.

DRINK LEMON WATER

Not only does lemon contain vitamin C and antioxidants, but it increases the amount of saliva you produce to keep your mucous membranes moist and soothe your sore throat.

For a particularly scratchy throat, take one tablespoon of concentrated lemon juice followed immediately by a tablespoon of honey just before bed, which will usually soothe your throat until morning.

SIP APPLE CIDER VINEGAR WITH HONEY

Apple cider vinegar has been used in folk medicine remedies for centuries. It contains acetic acid which has antibacterial properties.

To help relieve throat pain, mix 1 tablespoon of cider vinegar and 1 tablespoon of honey or sweetener in a cup of warm water.

Note: Honey shouldn’t be given to children under the age of one.

GINGER TEA

Ginger has been shown to relieve inflammation which should help sooth a sore throat. There also studies that show ginger has antibacterial powers.

You can purchase ginger tea or make your own tea with fresh ginger.

Boil 4 cups of water in a saucepan. Turn off heat, add 1 tablespoon of grated ginger root, and cover for 10 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon of honey (or sweetener) and a squeeze of lemon juice. Drink warm or cool. Reheat if desired.

READER RECIPES

Here are a couple of age-old recipes that readers swear by!

Horseradish Cocktail: “Make a syrup of 1 tablespoon horseradish, 1 teaspoon of honey, and 1 teaspoon of lemon juice. Mix in a glass of warm water and drink slowly.”

Cider Vinegar With Pepper: “Put a cap full of apple cider vinegar, 3 shakes each of cayenne pepper and black pepper into a cup of warm, salted water. Gargle as many times as needed. This remedy is said to change the pH balance in your throat.”

Of course, there are also medications including NSAIDs and throat sprays. But we hope that these home remedies soothe the pain of your sore throat and help relieve your discomfort.

Note Be sure to see doctor if your sore throat lasts more than a few days as you could have strep throat or another infection.

 

Source

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for November 10: HOME REMEDIES FOR COUGH RELIEF

HOME REMEDIES FOR COUGH RELIEF

NATURAL REMEDIES: HOW TO GET RID OF A COUGH
Coughs, while rarely serious, can be really annoying. Some of these natural remedies can provide great relief from a cough, especially when you’re having difficulty sleeping.

NATURAL REMEDIES TO RELIEVE COUGHS

  • Lemon juice, sweetened with loaf or crushed sugar, will relieve a cough. –The 1852 Old Farmer’s Almanac. 
  • The root of sweet flag was often powdered or sliced and used as a ginger substitute or throat lozenge.
  • Drink mullein flower tea.
  • Catnip tea helps reduce mucus.
  • To suppress a night cough, put 1 teaspoon black pepper and 1 teaspoon sugar into a mug. Pour in boiling water and let steep. The pepper will settle to the bottom. Sip, as needed.
  • Horehound drops, made with the extract of the leaves of the bitter mint Marrubium vulgare, can be combined with honey for a soothing cough drop, or served as a tea with lemon.
  • Hot and spicy foods act as expectorants, loosening up the lung’s secretions.
  • A reader told us that a teaspoon of mustard will relieve a cough for up to four hours. See if it works for you!
  • Some of these natural remedies might also be helpful to relieve anxiety and stress.

FOLK REMEDIES FOR A COUGH: THE DIRT CURE

Now here’s a cure for a severe winter cough that comes from The Old Farmer’s Almanac archives: The Dirt Cure! Here’s how it works:

  • Find a piece of land covered with bushes and small stones.
  • When the land has a foot of snow but is not frozen solid, shovel off the snow.
  • Then cut down the bushes and dig out the stones, turning up fresh and pure soil.
  • Bring fistfuls of soil to your face and inhale the scent of fresh earth.
  • Continue until you have cleared half an acre, and you will find yourself strong and hale, and entirely rid of your cough!

 

Source

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for November 10: NATURAL REMEDIES FOR A COLD

 

NATURAL REMEDIES FOR A COLD

HOME REMEDIES: HOW TO RELIEVE A COLD

What can we do to help our bodies through the process healing a cold? Here are some natural remedies for your body and mind.

NATURAL REMEDIES TO PROVIDE COLD RELIEF

  • Rose hip tea is full of vitamin C and can help prevent colds in advance.
  • Lemons, oranges, and apple cider are all considered to be cold remedies.
  • For chills, take fresh ginger root.
  • Historically, the layers of the onion were believed to draw contagious diseases from the patient; onions were often hung in sickrooms. Today, we know that onions have antibacterial qualities.
  • Cut up fresh garlic cloves and add them to chicken soup or other foods, or swallow small chunks of raw garlic like pills.
  • Eat loads of hot and spicy foods like chili to clear the sinuses.
  • Like garlic and onion, horseradish generates lots of heat to help offset colds. According to one farmer we know, a daily horseradish sandwich is the best cold remedy out there!
  • Prunes are rich in fiber, vitamins A and B, iron, calcium, and phosphorus. And they’ve been cured themselves!
  • To treat sore lips, go to bed with honey on them.
  • Troubled by cracked lips? Massage them with a dab of earwax (preferably your own!).

For a chest cold or bronchitis, try this remedy, submitted by one of our readers.

  • Boil a whole onion, and afterward, drink the water. You can add a little butter and salt if the taste is unbearable!

Source

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for November 10: COLD AND FLU PREVENTION TIPS

 

COLD AND FLU PREVENTION TIPS

HOW TO AVOID GETTING SICK

HOW TO PREVENT COLDS AND THE FLU

  • Keep current on inoculations, and ask your doctor about flu shots. The CDCrecommends that every person over the age of 6 months receive the vaccination. If possible, get the flu shot in October, before flu season begins.
  • Don’t share washcloths or towels. Use disposable towels or tissues instead of cloth handkerchiefs.
  • If you’re in a public restroom, try to avoid touching frequently-touched places, like the faucet or door handle. Shut the faucet off with a paper towel and try to push the door open with your shoulder or use the paper towel to turn the knob.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you sneeze or cough. If you don’t have a tissue, cough into your upper sleeve.
  • Colds are only caught from other people; during cold season, don’t shake hands or touch surfaces and then bring your fingers to your nose or face.
  • Don’t bite your nails; it spreads germs.
  • Don’t share food or drinks, even a taste.
  • Wash your hands often, especially after returning from public spaces! Use lots of soap and water.
  • When in doubt, hug instead of kiss, even if your heart says otherwise!
  • Drink plenty of liquids, especially fresh, pure water.
  • Get plenty of sleep. Go to bed early!
  • Cut back on sugars and alcoholic drinks.
  • Eat correctly, especially lots of fruits with high vitamin C content, as well as veggies and grains that cleanse your system.
  • If you can, take it easy and rest as soon as symptoms develop.
  • Stay at home if you are sick. Your school or office will not appreciate you inadvertently spreading your illness!

 

And here is some good old-fashioned advice from The 1852 Old Farmer’s Almanac:

To avoid fall fevers, eat moderately, drink sparingly, lie not down on the damp earth, nor overheat yourself; but keep your temper, and change your clothes as the weather changes.

Source

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Friday, November 9: BEST DAYS FOR NOVEMBER

 

BEST DAYS FOR NOVEMBER

Based on the Moon’s sign and phases in November, the best time to harvest is on the 11th and 12th for aboveground crops and on the 2nd, 3rd, 29th, and 30th for those belowground.

Additionally, it’s helpful to know that during a waxing Moon, pruning encourages growth; during a waning Moon, it discourages growth.

 

BEST DAYS FOR NOVEMBER 2018
Date Activities
November 2, 2018
have dental care, harvest below ground crops,
November 3, 2018
quit smoking, begin diet to lose weight, have dental care, harvest belowground crops, wean animals or children,
November 4, 2018
cut hair to discourage growth,
November 5, 2018
cut hair to discourage growth,
November 6, 2018
end projects, plant belowground crops, can, pickle, or make sauerkraut, breed animals, slaughter livestock,
November 7, 2018
breed animals, slaughter livestock,
November 8, 2018
start projects, breed animals, slaughter livestock,
November 9, 2018
go camping,
November 10, 2018
go camping,
November 11, 2018
harvest aboveground crops, begin logging, set posts or pour concrete,
November 12, 2018
harvest aboveground crops, begin logging, set posts or pour concrete,
November 13, 2018
castrate animals,
November 14, 2018
castrate animals,
November 15, 2018
castrate animals,
November 16, 2018
cut hair to encourage growth, plant aboveground crops,
November 17, 2018
begin diet to gain weight, cut hair to encourage growth, plant aboveground crops,
November 18, 2018
destroy pests and weeds, prune to encourage growth, cut hay,
November 19, 2018
destroy pests and weeds, prune to encourage growth, cut hay,
November 20, 2018
destroy pests and weeds, prune to encourage growth, cut hay,
November 22, 2018
begin diet to gain weight,
November 25, 2018
plant belowground crops, graft or pollinate, can, pickle, or make sauerkraut,
November 26, 2018
plant belowground crops, graft or pollinate, can, pickle, or make sauerkraut,
November 27, 2018
prune to discourage growth,
November 28, 2018
prune to discourage growth,
November 29, 2018
have dental care, harvest belowground crops,
November 30, 2018
quit smoking, begin diet to lose weight, have dental care, harvest belowground crops, wean animals or children,

 

SOURCE:

The Old Farmer’s Almanac: Full Moon for November 2018

 

FULL MOON FOR NOVEMBER 2018

NOVEMBER FULL BEAVER MOON

MOON PHASES FOR NOVEMBER 2018

The full Moon crests on Friday, November 23 at 12:39 A.M. EST, which means that you will see the full Moon on Thursday night (November 22) in most time zones of North America. This also means that the full Moon occurs on Thanksgiving night!

Below are the Moon phase times (Eastern Time). .

New Moon: November 7, 11:02 A.M. EST
First Quarter: November 15, 9:54 A.M. EST
Full Moon: November 23, 12:39 A.M. EST
Last Quarter: November 26, 7:19 P.M. EST

 

NOVEMBER FULL BEAVER MOON

November’s full Moon was called the Beaver Moon by both the Algonquin tribes and colonial Americans. The Native Americans used the monthly Moons and nature’s signs as a sort of calendar to track the seasons.

Why this name? Back then, this was the month to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs.

The November full Moon was also called the Full Frost Moon by other Native American tribes.

 

BEST DAYS IN NOVEMBER 2018

Below are the best days for certain activities, based on the Moon’s sign and phase.

WHAT ARE THE BEST DAYS TO…
Activity Best Days
begin diet to gain weight Nov 17Nov 22Dec 15Dec 19
begin diet to lose weight Nov 30Dec 5Dec 28
begin logging Nov 11Nov 12Dec 8Dec 9Dec 10
breed animals Dec 4Dec 5Dec 31
can, pickle, or make sauerkraut Nov 25Nov 26Dec 4Dec 5Dec 31
castrate animals Nov 13Nov 14Nov 15Dec 11Dec 12
cut hair to discourage growth Dec 1Dec 2Dec 3Dec 29Dec 30
cut hair to encourage growth Nov 16Nov 17Dec 13Dec 14Dec 15
cut hay Nov 18Nov 19Nov 20Dec 16Dec 17
destroy pests and weeds Nov 18Nov 19Nov 20Dec 16Dec 17
end projects Dec 6
go camping Nov 9Nov 10Dec 6Dec 7
graft or pollinate Nov 25Nov 26Dec 22Dec 23Dec 24
harvest aboveground crops Nov 11Nov 12Dec 18Dec 19
harvest belowground crops Nov 29Nov 30Dec 27Dec 28
have dental care Nov 29Nov 30Dec 27Dec 28
plant aboveground crops Nov 16Nov 17Dec 8Dec 14Dec 15
plant belowground crops Nov 25Nov 26Dec 4Dec 5Dec 31
prune to discourage growth Nov 27Nov 28Dec 25Dec 26
prune to encourage growth Nov 18Nov 19Nov 20Dec 16Dec 17
quit smoking Nov 30Dec 5Dec 28
set posts or pour concrete Nov 11Nov 12Dec 8Dec 9Dec 10
slaughter livestock Dec 4Dec 5Dec 31
start projects Dec 8
wean animals or children Nov 30Dec 5Dec 28

MOON FACTS

  • Did you know: The spin-time of the Moon on its own axis is identical to the time it takes the Moon to revolve around Earth, which is why the Moon always keeps almost exactly the same face toward us.
  • How much would you weigh on the Moon? Just multiply your weight (it doesn’t matter if it’s in pounds or kilograms) by 0.165. You’d weigh about 80 percent less!

 

Source

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Old Farmer’s Almanac: THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER 2018: HOLIDAYS, FUN FACTS, FOLKLORE

 

THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER 2018: HOLIDAYS, FUN FACTS, FOLKLORE

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT NOVEMBER
Catherine Boeckmann
What happens in November 2018? Here at the Almanac, we think of November as the month of food, when the best of cooks can shine and the best of eaters will surely get their fill. Here’s what November brings—from weather forecasts to folklore!

And the dead leaves lie huddled and still,
No longer blown hither and thither;
The last lone aster is gone;
The flowers of the witch-hazel wither …

–Robert Frost (1874-1963)

CALENDAR

November, the 11th month of the year, has 30 days and marks the beginning of the winter holiday season for most folks, even if the winter solstice doesn’t occur until late December.

We’ve made this month, named for the old ninth (novem) month in the Roman calendar, into a social time of community suppers, feasts of thanksgiving, and general elections.

NOVEMBER WEATHER

According to weather folklore, a heavy November snow will last until April, but for most regions, The Old Farmer’s Almanac predicts a warmer-than-average month.

]This winter is looking to have above-normal temperatures, on average, and November is no exception. The Old Farmer’s Almanac predicts northern Alaska will see the highest temperature change, with an average temperature of 10°F; that’s 8 degrees above normal. Many regions, including the Atlantic Corridor, Southeast, High Plains, Deep South, Lower Lakes, Heartland, Ohio Valley, Texas–Oklahoma, and Upper Midwest, are predicted to see a 4° to 6°F increase in temperature. Only the Desert Southwest, Pacific Southwest, southern Alaska, and eastern parts of Hawaii are predicted to see lower-than-average temperatures, by a range of 1 to 2 degrees.

NOVEMBER MOON

November’s full Moon was called the Beaver Moon by both the Algonquin tribes and colonial Americans. The Native Americans used the monthly Moons and nature’s signs as a sort of calendar to track the seasons. Why this name? Back then, this was the month to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. The November full Moon was also called the Full Frost Moon by other Native Americans.

In 2018, November’s full Moon occurs on the Friday the 23rd, at 12:39 A.M. ET.

GARDENING

Use small stakes or markers where you’ve planted bulbs or late-starting plants in the perennial garden to avoid disturbing them when you begin spring soil preparation.

Check trees around your house for weak branches that should be removed by you now, rather than by snow and ice later.

Did You Know: Autumn is the best time to prepare your yard properly for a healthy spring growth. It’s much easier to handle these tasks now!

NOVEMBER BIRTHSTONE

November’s traditional birthstone is the topaz, usually a yellow to amber color. The ancient Greeks believed that topaz could make a wearer invisible. A symbol of honor and strength, topaz was also believed to bring longevity and wisdom.

BIRTH FLOWERS

November’s birth flower is the chrysanthemum. Generally, chrysanthemums represent cheerfulness. A red one conveys “I love you.” White symbolizes truth or pure love. A yellow one indicates slighted love.

EVERYDAY ADVICE

The holiday season is now upon us!

It’s also the start of cold and flu season.

Stay warm with a cozy fire.

BEST DAYS FOR NOVEMBER

Based on the Moon’s sign and phases in November, the best time to harvest is on the 11th and 12th for aboveground crops and on the 2nd, 3rd, 29th, and 30th for those below ground.

Additionally, it’s helpful to know that during a waxing Moon, pruning encourages growth; during a waning Moon, it discourages growth.

How about dates to start dieting or quit smoking or cut hair?

MERCURY RETROGRADE

Get ready! In 2018, Mercury will be retrograde during November 17–December 6.

NOVEMBER ZODIAC

November’s Zodiac Signs are:

  • Scorpio: October 23 to November 22
  • Sagittarius: November 23 to December 21

 

NOVEMBER FOLKLORE

  • If there’s ice in November that will bear a duck, There’ll be nothing after but sludge and muck.
  • November take flail; let ships no more sail.
  • If trees show buds in November, the winter will last until May.
  • There is no better month in the year to cut wood than November.
  • Ice in November brings mud in December.
  • A heavy November snow will last until April.

SOURCE:

The Old Farmer’s Almanac